Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

ARGYLE STREET, ARGYLL ARCADE (THROUGH 98-102 ARGYLE STREET) 3-66 (INCLUSIVE NOS, LEADING TO BUCHANAN STREET)Reference: LB32613

Status: Designated

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Summary

Information

  • Category: A
  • Date Added: 15/12/1970

Location

  • Local Authority: Glasgow
  • Planning Authority: Glasgow
  • Burgh: Glasgow

National Grid Reference

  • NGRNS 58992 65135
  • Coordinates258992, 665135

Description

John Baird I, 1827. L-plan, 2-storey arcade, linking Argyle Street and Buchanan Street. Modern shop fronts at ground with some pilasters of 1827 retained. 16-pane glazing to 1st floor windows, with dividing pilasters and continuous dentil cornice. Curved windows by entrance blocks, and curved bay at junction. Shields on dividing cornice. Winding stone stair. Glazed cast-iron hammerbeam roof.

Statement of Special Interest

The Argyll Arcade is the oldest shopping arcade in Scotland and was modelled on the Parisian Arcades of the late 18th century. It is around 450' long and the developer was James Robertson Reid. Crown Arcade, 31-35 Virginia Street, nearby makes an interesting and contemporary comparison. The 3-storey public house, 61 Argyll Arcade entered through the arcade and opening onto Morrison Court behind to W is listed separately. Alterations and additions to Arcade in 1933 by Miller and Black.

The Argyll Arcade is entered at Buchanan Street via an entrance in the Argyll Chambers, 28-32 Buchanan Street (see separate listing).

List description updated, 2013.

References

Bibliography

M MacKeith, Shopping Arcades 1817-1939 (1985), pp.48-9. B. 29.9.33, P.522.

About Designations

Listed Buildings

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest and these are selected according to criteria published in the www.historic-scotland.gov.uk/shep-dec2011.pdf, Annex 2, pp74-76.

The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

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Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The local authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historic-scotland.gov.uk.

Legislation introduced on 1 October 2015 allows us to state that: an object or structure fixed to the listed building; any object or structure within the curtilage of the listed building; and, any part or feature of the listed building that is not of architectural or historic interest may be excluded from a listing. If part of your building is not listed under the new legislation, the part will be excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

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Printed: 02/05/2016 11:44