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Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

CRAIGIEHALL TEMPLE (OFF CAMMO ROAD)Reference: LB26928

Status: Designated

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Summary

Information

  • Category: A
  • Date Added: 14/07/1966

Location

  • Local Authority: Edinburgh
  • Planning Authority: Edinburgh
  • Burgh: Edinburgh

National Grid Reference

  • NGRNT 17025 74912
  • Coordinates317025, 674912

Description

Dated 1759 incorporating earlier portico. Circular-plan, single storey drum temple, (originally with an extra stage, removed in 1975), with rectangular-plan stair tower at rear to SE, modern unsympathetic addition to E built 1992. Rubble built, ashlar fronted. Base course; band course; dentil cornice.

N ELEVATION: overlooking Craigiehall Estate. Early 18th century Doric portico with corner piers and paired central columns on die; massy segmental pediment ornately carved with monogram and arms of 3rd Earl of Annandale and his wife Sophia Fairholm. Flanking plain windows, now with unglazed small-pane grille, inscribed marble date plaque above right window with Latin inscription 'live happy while you can among joyful things'.

S ELEVATION: stair projection, rubble with ashlar quoins. Large oculus at upper stage. Door at ground of left return.

All windows unglazed but with metal grilles. Concrete roof.

INTERIOR: octagonal interior. Floor gone between ground and 2nd level; plain classical chimneypieces against W wall; blocked window opening to right of 1st floor chimney.

Tiled floor inlaid with marble. Concrete ceiling. Interior in neglected condition.

Statement of Special Interest

Listed category A for the portico. The temple is located in the middle of the deer park of Craigiehall Estate on the top of Leny Hill. The temple is dated 1759 but the portico is earlier, certainly pre 1716 when Sophia Fairholm died, wife of the 3rd Earl of Annandale whose arms are shown on the pediment. The authors of the Edinburgh volume of the Buildings of Scotland have suggested that the portico may have been one of the forecourt gates designed by the Earl of Mar and made by Alexander McGill in 1708. The top floor of the temple was removed in 1975. In 1992 an unsympathetic dwelling house was built against the NE side of the temple. The single storey with attic, rectangular-plan dwelling abuts onto temple at SE with a glazed wood angular porch, as yet there is no access to the temple. Grey brick base, dry-dash, rubble to S elevation; grey slate piend and platformed roof with square quadripartite dormer on E elevation. Craigiehall and associated buildings are listed separately.

References

Bibliography

J Gifford, C McWilliam, D Walker EDINBURGH (1984) p592. F H Groome ORDNANCE GAZETTEER OF SCOTLAND (1895) p295. Major C B Innes CRAIGIEHALL - THE STORY OF A FINE SCOTS COUNTRY HOUSE. Typescript (1987). AN INVENTORY OF GARDENS AND DESIGNED LANDSCAPE IN SCOTLAND

Vol 5, p38.

About Designations

Listed Buildings

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest and these are selected according to criteria published in the www.historic-scotland.gov.uk/shep-dec2011.pdf, Annex 2, pp74-76.

The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Enquiries relating to works to listed buildings should be made to the local authority in the first instance. Listed building consent is required for works which a local authority considers will affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest and local authorities also decide if listed building consent is required.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The local authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot.

Legislation introduced on 1 October 2015 allows us to state that: an object or structure fixed to the listed building; any object or structure within the curtilage of the listed building; and, any part or feature of the listed building that is not of architectural or historic interest may be excluded from a listing. If part of your building is not listed under the new legislation, the part will be excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support.

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Printed: 30/05/2016 07:48